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1. Get to know your prompt

❶Keep in mind that the college application and perhaps interview are the only ways a college gets to know about you, and they know only what you tell them. Outline your qualifications and highlight your talents in a cover letter.

2. Brainstorm

Some tips to help you write a college essay about yourself
Purpose of learning how to write a college essay about yourself

It is different than a cover letter in that the purpose of a cover letter is to introduce a candidate for employment or admission, while a non-fiction essay is for exploring a theme.

This type of writing requires that you tell a story about yourself, using specific, real-life details that highlight a particular theme or idea throughout the essay. Common themes or prompts for autobiographical essays include overcoming obstacles, great successes or spectacular failures, and what you learned about yourself.

Focus on a single theme or purpose. Unlike a cover letter, an autobiographical essay should not jump around quickly between different themes or events. It should stay focused on a single event or theme that makes some greater point. Depending on the assignment, you may need to connect a personal anecdote to a reading or an idea from class. Start brainstorming topics that are connected to that idea, to give yourself a variety of options to choose from.

Write about complex topics, not cliches. An essay does not need to make you look good, so much as how well you communicate the event. When you are thinking of topics to write about, think about your triumphs and successes, but also give some thought to parts of your life that could use improvement. For example, remember the time you forgot to pick up your sister from practice while you were partying with friends, or the time you skipped class and got caught might make for great essays too.

Common autobiographical essay cliches include sports stories, mission trips, and dead grandmothers. While these can all make for excellent essays if done well, it is difficult to stand out when telling the story of how your lacrosse team lost a big game, then practiced hard, then won.

It has been written before. Limit the timeline as much as possible. It is almost impossible to write a good five page essay about your entire life up to your 14th birthday. Even a topic like "my senior year" is much too complex to actually pull off in a good essay. Pick an event that spanned no more than a day, or a few days at most. If you want to tell the story of your nasty break-up, start with the break-up, do not start with the star-crossed way you met.

You have got to get immediately to the tension in the story. If you want to write a good non-fictional essay, it needs to be chock-full of vivid details and specific images and senses. When you have an idea of your topic, start writing a "memory list" of specific things that you remember about the event. What was the weather like? What did it smell like? What did your mother say to you?

Your opening paragraph will set the tone for the rest of the essay. Rather than telling the dull biographical details your name, your place of birth, your favorite food , find a way to express the essence of the story you are going to tell and the themes you are going to explore in your essay. Start in the middle of the story. Do not worry about "building suspense" in an autobiographical essay. If you want to tell the story about the time you accidentally ruined Thanksgiving dinner, then write about peoples' reaction or how you moved on.

That is the essay. Connect the details to the big theme. If you are writing an essay about a disaster at Thanksgiving some time ago, do not forget that you are writing about more than a burnt turkey.

What's the point of the story? What are we supposed to be getting out of this story? At least once a page, you need to have some thread that ties us back to the main theme or focus of the essay you are writing.

If you need a cover letter for a job or internship, for college, or for some other application opportunity, sometimes there will be a description or prompt of what is expected in the letter. Depending on the nature of the application, you may need to describe your readiness to complete the job, your qualifications, or other specific criteria.

Possible prompts may include: Outline your qualifications and highlight your talents in a cover letter. Write about who you are. In a cover letter, describe how your education and experience qualifies you for this position. Explain how this opportunity will benefit your career goals. Match the style to the purpose. Different employers and situations will call for different styles and tones in a cover letter. If you are applying to a university, it is always best to use a professional and academic tone throughout the letter.

When you are applying to blog for a tech start-up that tells you to "Explain three things you rock at! If you are unsure whether or not telling an amusing anecdote about your friend's bachelor party is appropriate in a cover letter, it is probably best to leave it out. Describe why you are writing in the first paragraph.

The first two sentences should explain the purpose of your cover letter and your application clearly. If someone reading your cover letter is unclear about what it is you are writing about, your application will quickly get chucked in the trash.

I think my experience and training makes me an ideal candidate for this position. Structure the cover letter as cause and effect. A cover letter should explain to the potential employer or admissions board why you are the best candidate for the position, or why you should be admitted to the university or program to which you are applying.

To do this, you need to make sure every cover letter describes what you bring to the table and how that will help satisfy the ambitions of both parties. Make sure all cover letters describe the following details clearly: Who you are and where you come from. Where you want to go. How this opportunity would potentially help you get there. Detail your talents and skills specifically. What makes you the ideal type of candidate for the job or position you are applying for? What experiences, skills, training, and talent do you bring to the table?

Be as specific as possible. It is alright to note that you are "A passionate leader in all walks of life" but it would be much better to write about an example of a time you lead in a surprising way. Stay focused on skills and talents that connect specifically to the thing you are applying for. Extracurricular involvement, leadership roles, and other types of outstanding achievement may be important to you personally, but it may be totally extraneous.

If you include something, ensure to connect it specifically to the goal of the cover letter. Describe your goals and ambitions. Where do you want to go from here? Both admission boards and employers are more interested in people with ambition and self-starters who will be motivated to achieve at a high level. If you are writing a university cover letter, it is obvious that you have to have a degree to get a job as a doctor, but how did you come to choose this field?

Why did you choose this school? What, specifically, do you want to take away from the experience? Explain how both parties will benefit from your selection. What do you bring to the table that other candidates do not? How would the university benefit from having you as a member of the student body?

How would you benefit from getting that new job? Your readers will be interested in hearing how you present yourself. Be careful about using a cover letter to critique a business. It is not the time to describe the suffering of a particular brand over the previous fiscal quarter, then promising that you will be able to turn it around with your ideas. That might not go over well if you are hired, and then you are unable to live up to the promise.

Do not mistake the cover letter for the resume. While it is important to list your best skills as they apply to the job you are interested in, a cover letter is not the place to get specific. Make sure the resume and the cover letter contain different information.

Even if it is impressive, a high GPA or class ranking does not belong in a cover letter. Highlight it on your resume, but do not include it in two different places of the application.

Ideal cover letters should be no more than one page, single-spaced, or somewhere between words. Certain places may ask for longer letters, in the neighborhood of words, but it is rare that cover letters should ever be longer than that. Cover letters are usually single-spaced and in a legible font, such as Times or Garamond. Generally, cover letters should include a salutation addressed to the admission board or a specific contact listed on the application, a closing with your signature, and the following contact information included in the header of the document: Write about yourself in the third person.

Short blurb-style bio notes are common in work directories, pamphlets, and other materials. You may be asked to provide one for any number of reasons. They are usually short, and can be somewhat awkward to write. Pretend you are writing about someone else. Write your name and start describing that person like a character or a friend: Explain your position or title. Be sure to clarify your specific role and specialty, taking into consideration the purpose of the bio note.

Describe what it is you do and what it is that people know you for. If you are a jack of all trades, say so. Do not be afraid to list "actor, musician, mother, motivational speaker, and professional rock climber" if they all apply equally. Briefly list your responsibilities or accomplishments. If you are a frequent winner of awards and distinctions, a bio note is a good time to list them and toot your own horn. Try to keep bio notes focused on recent history. It is common to list degrees that you have received.

Pay particular attention to anything that ties into the work you are writing about. If you have special training, include it here.

Include a bit of your personal life. Bio notes do not need to be cold. It is common to end on a small personal detail that will spice up bio notes a bit. Consider including your cat's name, or a quirky detail about a hobby: It can seem funny to immediately start with "John Smith loves rafting and hates eating Cheetos. He's a total boss" and such bio notes can be appropriate for some venues, however be careful to avoid awkward oversharing.

Telling everyone about your killer hangover might be best left for after work talk. Sometimes you may feel driven to write about sensitive subjects in a personal essay, but how should this type of material be approached?

First and foremost, do remember that you should choose the appropriate material for the audience you are writing for. While it may be okay to talk about a topic such as mental illness or poverty in an essay for a university application, you likely would not want to discuss any questionable things you might have done in the past, such as cheating on exams in high school.

Remember that when it comes to writing personal essays, it is okay to change some details or facts such as names and dates if you find it necessary to do so out of respect for others. For many people, the only thing harder than beginning a personal essay is ending one. First, where does the story that you are telling end? If you were telling the story of recovering after the death of a loved one, you might choose the moment where you finally began to heal.

If you were telling the story of overcoming a problem such as dyslexia, you could end with getting your first A in English class. You may also consider an ending that mirrors the beginning of your essay. If you started with the story of being bullied, you may end your essay by talking about how you helped another person who was being bullied. Udemy offers a course on memoir writing that could be ideal for those looking to go deeper into writing about the things that they have experienced in their lives.

Be sure to check the course out so you can write the best personal essay possible. Create a Course Corporate Learning Mobile. Music Sports Games Marketing. An Essay About Myself: Beginning Your Essay Your personal essay is essentially the story of your life — or at least, the story of one important moment or journey you have made in your life.

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Part of the college application, it is a short essay that asks you to tell the admissions department about yourself. While that sounds simple, it can be tough to figure out what to write about and.

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Apr 22,  · Writing about yourself can be one of the hardest things that you have to do, whether you’re writing a personal essay for a school project or for admission to a college or downlwhopkd.cf: April Klazema. Learning how to write a college essay about yourself is an easy thing. It is easy because you know the subject matter well unlike any other essay. It is easy because you know the subject matter well unlike any other essay.