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Examples List on The Myth Of Sisyphus

Essays on The myth of sisyphus

❶While we are living life, such absurdity is basically impossible to acknowledge — so, the answer, it seems, is just to get back to living life and shut up.

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Science can only describe existence, it cannot explain why there is existence or what its meaning or purpose is, as Spinoza among others believed it would one day be able to. Yet humans need meaning, even though it appears there is no meaning to be found. Much of life is characterised by such absurd paradoxes: Science professes a sensible explanation of the world, but ends in fantastic stories of microscopic galaxies of atoms that cannot be seen.

This is the absurd condition and "from the moment absurdity is recognized, it becomes a passion, the most harrowing of all. It is not the world that is absurd, nor human thought: He then characterizes a number of philosophies that describe and attempt to deal with this feeling of the absurd, by Heidegger , Jaspers , Shestov , Kierkegaard , and Husserl.

All of these, he claims, commit "philosophical suicide" by reaching conclusions that contradict the original absurd position, either by abandoning reason and turning to God, as in the case of Kierkegaard and Shestov, or by elevating reason and ultimately arriving at ubiquitous Platonic forms and an abstract god, as in the case of Husserl.

For Camus, who set out to take the absurd seriously and follow it to its final conclusions, these "leaps" cannot convince.

Taking the absurd seriously means acknowledging the contradiction between the desire of human reason and the unreasonable world. Suicide, then, also must be rejected: The contradiction must be lived; reason and its limits must be acknowledged, without false hope. However, the absurd can never be accepted: While the question of human freedom in the metaphysical sense loses interest to the absurd man, he gains freedom in a very concrete sense: To embrace the absurd implies embracing all that the unreasonable world has to offer.

Without a meaning in life, there is no scale of values. Thus, Camus arrives at three consequences from fully acknowledging the absurd: Camus then goes on to present examples of the absurd life. He begins with Don Juan , the serial seducer who lives the passionate life to the fullest. The next example is the actor , who depicts ephemeral lives for ephemeral fame.

Camus's third example of the absurd man is the conqueror, the warrior who forgoes all promises of eternity to affect and engage fully in human history. He chooses action over contemplation, aware of the fact that nothing can last and no victory is final. Here Camus explores the absurd creator or artist. Since explanation is impossible, absurd art is restricted to a description of the myriad experiences in the world. Our lives today are to live in a way that we serve God and the people he has put in our community.

God holds us responsible for our failure. Jesus teaches about a time in the future when we will all have to come before God in judgment and face the consequences for the way we have lived. Sisyphus is a happy man because he was able to come to terms with his punishment although it had to be eternal. As you relate to God, and live according to his direction, others will notice a difference in you.

God has given us the great opportunity of sharing his love with others. Home Essays The Myth of Sisyphus. The Myth of Sisyphus 10 October We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind. Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

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The Myth of Sisyphus essay by Camus. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. Learn More in these related Britannica articles: The term was famously used by Friedrich Nietzsche to describe the disintegration of traditional morality in Western society. He attacked the literary, philosophical, and ecclesiastical establishments of his day for misrepresenting….

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The Myth of Sisyphus, philosophical essay by Albert Camus, published in French in as Le Mythe de Sisyphe. Published in the same year as Camus’s novel L’Étranger (The Stranger), The Myth of Sisyphus contains a sympathetic analysis of contemporary nihilism and touches on the nature of the absurd.

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The Myth of Sisyphus (French: Le Mythe de Sisyphe) is a philosophical essay by Albert Camus. The English translation by Justin O'Brien was first published in The English translation by Justin O'Brien was first published in Author: Albert Camus.

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- Albert Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus Albert Camus' essay, 'The Myth Of Sisyphus' is an insightful analysis of the classic work, 'The Myth Of Sisyphus'. In some regards Camus' view of Sisyphus can seem quite accurate and in tune with the original text, but based on Camus' interpretation of the justness of Sisyphus' punishment, it is clear that the writer has some different ideas as well. The Myth of Sisyphus In the essay of “The Myth of Sisyphus” Albert Camus suggests that there is a possibility that there is no real meaning to life and that as humans, it is a pointless gesture to go looking for this religious or universal meaning.

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The The myth of sisyphus is one of the most popular assignments among students' documents. If you are stuck with writing or missing ideas, scroll down and find inspiration in the best samples. The myth of sisyphus is quite a rare and popular topic for writing an essay, but it certainly is in our database. Over the past few weeks I've found myself immersed in Sartre and Camus, beginning with Sartre's "Existentialism is a Humanism" and then rereading Sartre's essay on Camus (and why reading The Myth of Sisyphus is essential if one is to properly understand The Stranger) and rereading Camus' The Stranger, and then finally reading the present work/5.