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Does Music Help You Study?

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Let’s bring back the Sabbath as a radical act against the always-on economy
Emily Southey
The course website and blog for the Fall 2015 instance of Penn State's SC200 course

The Mozart Effect is book by Don Campbell that has the world's research on all the beneficial effects of certain type of music. This book includes research on how music makes us smarter. Scientists at Stanford University in California have recently revealed a molecular basis for the Mozart Effect, but not other music. Rauscher and her colleague H.

Li, a geneticist, have discovered that rats, like humans, perform better on learning and memory tests after listening to a specific Mozart sonata. Students who either sang or played a musical instrument scored an average of 51 points higher on the verbal portion of the test and an average of 39 points higher on math. According to the research outlined in the book, musical pieces such as those of Mozart can relieve stress, improve communication and increase efficiency.

Music starts up our brain and makes us feel more energetic and a link has been made between music and learning. Music also stimulates different regions of the brain responsible for memory, motor control, timing and language.

At McGill University in Montreal , neuroscientist Anne Blood, said, "You can activate different parts of the brain, depending on what music you listen to. A study published in " Psychology of Music " in concluded that workers listening to music had higher productivity levels than those who didn't. The researchers speculated that the music heightened the workers' mood, thereby increasing their motivation.

Therefore, even though music may create some degree of interference with other tasks, and uses up mental processing resources, the net effect may sometimes be to improve concentration and motivation.

However, not all research has agreed with the aforementioned study, and some researchers have found that music tends to be more distracting than beneficial. Therefore, the answer is inconclusive.

Softer, more ambient music is often suggested as leading to more effective studying than louder, more lyric-heavy music. So keep an eye out for the latest research in this fascinating and ever-evolving area. The answers we're all waiting for may be lurking just around the corner. Education is the basis of personal growth and professional success. The ability to impart knowledge to others is one of the greatest gifts we have. I have for years had trouble studying or working with music. It is very distracting to me since I have synesthesia.

I see music , but several teachers and other people have told me that I would study better with music in the background. It always seems to distract. Now I know that I am not the only one. Nice topic, I liked the way you started with questions that you sort of answered at the end.

Good, informative sources as well. Do you prefer to study with music? Or since you are a movie buff with a movie going on in the background? Hi Margaret, glad I could help! As for me, I do like having music on, but I prefer instrumental music when I study. As I mentioned in my post, movie scores work pretty well for me, usually.

Another thing I think would be an interesting research topic would be looking at whether the language the vocal music is in will have an effect. Unfortunately I have to save my movie watching for when my homework is done! Sheela, Too bad, for me it is the other way around. I can put on a good marathon and do lots of homework admittedly not as quickly as without tv.

I would like to see more research into this as well. Hi Sheela, In school I found I could study better without music. TV is a different story. I never work in front of a TV, but I can read on one end of the couch while my husband watches TV from the other. You all need to assess whether writing in first person adds anything to the post. I think that assessing whether writing in the first person adds to a post is very helpful advice.

But given that there is still a trend toward more personal writing styles, and that blogs are by their nature personal, I wonder whether you could say more about how you would gauge whether to write in first person or not.

Funny but still rings true. When we were kids, my dad always used to get angry at my brother and me because we could never study without music running in the background, sometimes it was TV!! As you said Sheela, this depends on person to person.

I guess it depends whether you want to study with music in the background, or listen to music with a book in front of you! I lison to his songs in all my classes and even gym.

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Students frequently listen to music while studying to make the process less painful and, in some cases, because they believe music will help them learn. The effects of listening to music while studying are mixed, however, and depend upon the type of music you listen to as well as the degree to which it distracts you.

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Many students feel that listening to music while doing homework will help them work more efficiently. Unfortunately, music is a major distraction, especially music that contains lyrics. While doing homework and listening to music, not only is your brain trying to comprehend the words you're seeing, but also the words you're hearing.

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But music that’s too loud or with too much of an upbeat tempo can also be distracting, so having a playlist or specific artist you turn to for studying music can really help. If you’re the type of person who has more difficulty multitasking and is easily distracted, listening to music while studying may just cause your attention to drift to the music rather than . So should you listen to music while you study or do homework? Unfortunately, the answer I have to give you is “it depends!” It seems like in general, music with vocals is distracting, while instrumental music might actually help your performance.

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One expert, Alexander Pantelyat, an assistant professor of neurology and the co-founder and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine, sounds off on music’s relationship to language—and whether background music can help you focus on . 8 thoughts on “ Listening to Music While Doing Homework/Studying Lead To Better Results? Stephen B Caruso October 23, at am. While studying, some people prefer to listen to music. Others need total silence, it just depends on who you are and what helps you study.