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To make a model of a mountain, use a soda bottle or a tall cardboard cylinder as the center of the mountain. Attach cardboard strips from the high point to a wooden or cardboard base. Cover with paper-mache strips and paint. The novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" deals with serious issues, such as rape and racial inequality, as told from the viewpoint of a year-old girl. It was written by Harper Lee and is loosely based on her observations of events that occurred during her childhood in her Alabama hometown in the s.

The strongest known metal is tungsten. Its atomic mass is Although one of Pythagoras' contributions to mathematics was the Pythagorean Theorem, he also proved other axioms, worked on prime and composite numbers and found an irrational number. Pythagoras was a Greek mathematician who was a student of Thales, another Greek mathematician. The elevation of Quito, the capital city of Ecuador, is approximately 9, feet, according to Ecuador Explorer.

Quito is located in a long, narrow valley in the Andes between the Volcano Pinchincha to the west and the canyon of the Machangara River to the east.

The eight steps of the scientific method are: The eight steps of the scientific method can be grouped into three stages: Active listening is important, because it establishes a connection between speaker and listener. This allows for ease of interaction and ensures that messages are being related completely and properly. Active listening helps develop better speaking skills and stronger groups. Anecdotal information from Kino graduates suggests that the early control over their education continues to serve them well into college; they feel better equipped to manage their time and approach professors with questions.

One of the reasons that we continue to dole out mountains of homework, Kohn says, is our obsession with standardized tests. This concern is especially relevant with the latest Program for International Student Assessment PISA results placing American students 25th in math and 21st in science. A recent comparative study of kids in China, Japan and two U. So, what's the solution? The National Parent Teacher Association suggests children in kindergarten through second grade should do homework for no more than 10 to 20 minutes a day, and for third through sixth graders the limit is minutes a day.

Kohn says the question isn't just, "How much homework is too much? That means repetitive practice problems from page textbooks get tossed out the window. Instead, Kohn says parents should be asking two fundamental questions: Does this assignment make kids more excited about the topic and learning in general? Does this assignment help kids to think more deeply about questions that matter?

What You Can Do For parents who want to probe deeper into the quality of homework their child is getting, Kohn says the first step is to check the school's policy. Wherever the homework debate goes next, be it the front pages or on the back burner, it's worth taking a moment to examine if we're asking the right questions about our children's education. The good news is, it's never too late to start.

I have read and agree to Education. We'll send you a link to a secure page where you can easily create your new password Go back to sign in page. Has your email changed? If you no longer have access to the e-mail address associated with your account, contact Customer Service for help restoring access to your account. The email is on its way. Please allow a few minutes for it to arrive. Didn't receive the email? Which Are the Best Ones for Students? Today, Education World writer Mary Daniels Brown analyzes and compares a handful of free online encyclopedias.

A Guide to Homework Help Online Cyber-savvy students can have their own personal e-homework helper just a mouse click away -- if they just know where to look! Education World writer Glori Chaika hones in on online homework help resources that your students will find useful.

Links to dozens of homework resources plus an e-interview with year-old B. Part 2 New Programs Meet New Needs Education World writer Mary Daniels Brown looks at several new and distinctive virtual high schools and examines the concerns of some of those programs' critics. A close-up look at six new virtual schools! Whats being done to improve performance? Look to math challenges that fire up thinking skills and are cool enough for middle grades.

Teachers and students comment about Figure This! Also, more than a dozen other great online resources for connecting math and real life! Homework Help Site Reviews Reviews of great sites that will help you get your homework done right! AskJeeves for Kids The Kid's version of the world's premier natural language question-answering service on the internet. The infoplease Homework Center The site features a searchable database of information, plus access to almanacs and other resources.

Study Aids Check out this helpful page in the Higher Education Community for helpful tips, resources, and study guides. More than 1, FREE lessons. PD content to get you through the day. Download without a subscription. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips Thank you for subscribing to the Educationworld. Classroom Problem Solver Dr. Well, we hope that this section will cheer you up with lots of great resources to help get you homework done right!

Reviews Homework Help Site Reviews Reviews of great sites that will help you get your homework done right! Math Related Links AskJeeves for Kids The Kid's version of the world's premier natural language question-answering service on the internet.

Trending Icebreakers Volume 5: It's time to make a fresh start. You've done some summer reading on classroom management, and you're eager to try out some new ideas. You've learned from past mistakes, and you look forward this year to avoiding those mistakes. Most fun of all, the opening days of school are an opportunity to get to know a whole new group of kids!

What will you do during those first few days of school? What activities might you do to help you get to know your new students?

What activities will help students get to know you and one another? For the last three years, Education World has presented a new group of getting-to-know-you ideas -- or icebreakers -- for those first days of school. Here are 19 ideas -- ideas tried and tested by Education World readers -- to help develop classroom camaraderie during the opening days of school. Opening-Day Letter Still looking for more ideas? Don't forget our archive of more than icebreaker activities.

Write a letter to your students. In that letter, introduce yourself to students. Tell them about your hopes for the new school year and some of the fun things you'll be doing in class.

In addition, tell students a few personal things about yourself; for example, your likes and dislikes, what you did over the summer, and your hobbies. Ask questions throughout the letter. You might ask what students like most about school, what they did during the summer, what their goals for the new school year are, or what they are really good at.

In your letter, be sure to model the correct parts of a friendly letter! On the first day of school, display your letter on an overhead projector. Then pass each student a sheet of nice stationery. Have the students write return letters to you. In this letter, they will need to answer some of your questions and tell you about themselves. This is a great way to get to know each other in a personal way! Mail the letter to students before school starts, and enclose a sheet of stationery for kids to write you back.

Each piece should have a matching piece of the same length. There should be enough pieces so that each student will have one. Then give each student one piece of string, and challenge each student to find the other student who has a string of the same length. After students find their matches, they can take turns introducing themselves to one another. You can provide a list of questions to help students "break the ice," or students can come up with their own. You might extend the activity by having each student introduce his or her partner to the class.

Give each student a slip of paper with the name of an animal on it. Then give students instructions for the activity: They must locate the other members of their animal group by imitating that animal's sound only. No talking is allowed. The students might hesitate initially, but that hesitation soon gives way to a cacophony of sound as the kids moo, snort, and giggle their way into groups.

The end result is that students have found their way into their homerooms or advisory groups for the school year, and the initial barriers to good teamwork have already been broken.

Hold a large ball of yarn. Start by telling the students something about yourself. Then roll the ball of yarn to a student without letting go of the end of the yarn.

The student who gets the ball of yarn tells his or her name and something good about himself or herself. Then the student rolls the yarn to somebody else, holding on to the strand of yarn. Soon students have created a giant web. After everyone has spoken, you and all the students stand up, continuing to hold the yarn.

Start a discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of teamwork -- for example, the students need to work together and not let others down. To drive home your point about teamwork, have one student drop his or her strand of yarn; that will demonstrate to students how the web weakens if the class isn't working together. Questions might include the following: What is your name? Where were you born?

How many brothers or sisters do you have? What are their names? Do you have any pets? Tell students to write those questions on a piece of paper and to add to that paper five more questions they could ask someone they don't know.

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Discovery Education offers free educational resources to help students with homework, test preparation and more. Browse our free student resources! Education World writer Glori Chaika hones in on online homework help resources that your students will find useful. INCLUDED: Links to dozens of homework resources plus an e-interview with year-old B. J. Pinchbeck, creator of BJ Pinchbeck's Homework Helper.