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❶Set a reasonable homework schedule for students Students' time matters Ten minutes per grade level for example, 40 minutes for fourth graders 4. You may want to watch the video once prior to reading this section so that you can become acquainted with how the featured afterschool program organizes its homework center and manages homework help.




This volunteer based program accepts applications from interested adults who are willing to give their time and support.

All children are monitored in a big group session at all times. The program will include supper, snacks, academic games, tutorials, mentoring, a Reading Club, a chess club, a nutrition club, a poetry club, an art club and a foreign language component. The Druid Heights community is located two miles northwest of downtown Baltimore in zip code of the 44th Legislative District, within Census Tract The juvenile arrest rate, although declining, is still high compared to the overall statistics for the city.

Crime and drug activity in the Druid Heights community is high. Most parents are at work when children return home from school. This is a critical time in the day when children need supervision and academic support. The after school program will keep them out of the street and away from trouble. The after school program will identify the needs of families and provide resources and assistance from program offered at the community center.

Families will access to a myriad of services. Staff from the program and designated volunteers will visit the schools of the participants on a bi-weekly basis or as necessary to determine the progress of our students.

A core principle is to celebrate all progress for each student. We believe in positive reinforcement and will apply it on the daily basis. A cart will be posted with the name of each participant where award points can be added for successes throughout the school year.

All awards, certificates and good Progress Reports will earn students are point on the board. The points can also be awarded for participation and good behavior. In the after school program children are encouraged to read books, practice good grammar and do math exercises while learning and having fun. The program will serve three major goals for the community:. To reinforce reading and math skills during the homework time in order to prevent children from falling behind while reinforcing academic achievements.

To support struggling families by giving their children education, mentorship and hope for a better future. Many community residents and volunteers from around the City are looking for ways to give back. This program will offer an opportunity for people to come in and assist the children in the community.

All volunteers will be subject to a background check and will work under the direction of the Office of Community Resources. Tavon Benson, Community Organizer is the direct contact for the program. Anthony Pressley, Director of Community Resources is the general overseer of the program. All reporting is to Mr. Little, the Executive Director.

The program will recognize the volunteers on a quarterly basis and award gifts donated by Bed, Bath and Beyond. Each parent will be requested to sign an application for volunteering.

The program hopes to have the full support of the parents and to serve as the liaison between the student, school and family. The community is that village of resources, support and strength.

All students rotate between the classroom and quiet room to maximize their study experience. Students work at their own pace. If they finish before the homework portion of the afterschool program is over—or do not have homework on that particular day—they can move to another space and work on education-based games either individually or in groups.

Work with individual students on homework. In the video, afterschool instructors primarily help students with homework by providing one-on-one assistance and tutoring. Sometimes instructors ask open-ended questions to elicit student thinking about the problem they are working on. At other times, instructors ask questions to assess student understanding and comprehension.

Some instructors are school-day teachers and are able to provide help with specific content-related problems. Ask Yourself How do you use questioning techniques to draw out student thinking and help them find their own answers to problems? How do you use questioning to test student understanding? Are there school-day teachers or other staff who can provide support for students in a particular content area?

Tutoring, Mentoring, and Building Study Skills. Plan a schedule for homework center activities and follow it consistently. In the video, when students first enter the homework help portion of the afterschool program, they are provided with a snack and an engaging warm-up activity such as a group game or question of the day.

If students have no homework, they sign up to play educational games or work on projects in a separate space from the homework help center.

Ask Yourself Do you follow a consistent routine with students so that they know what to do and where they need to go whether they have homework or not? Does your homework center provide a collection of educational games and activities for students who don't have homework, or for those students who have finished their work early? Provide at least two separate areas where students can focus on their homework. In the video, a Title I classroom provides a quiet place for students to get one-on-one help with the instructor.

A regular classroom provides a space for students to talk about assignments and work collaboratively. Ask Yourself How do you plan and develop your homework center workspace with regard to students' homework needs? Do you arrange the desks for small-group or large-group collaborative work? Are there ways that you can organize the space to better meet students' homework needs? Offer help to students who have difficulty reading or understanding assignments by allowing them to work in a smaller, private workspace with one-on-one attention.

In the video, a student is shown working with an instructor in a Title I room. In this smaller room, with partitions that provide privacy, it is easier for students to get and accept individual help.

The instructor sits closely to the student as he or she works. She asks each student to read the text or assignment aloud. She asks each to explain what he or she is doing as they work, or thinking about the assigned work. Ask Yourself Do you have a quiet, private space where students who may require more one-on-one assistance can receive it without judgment or embarrassment? Do you ask students to re-read text or assignments to test their understanding of what they are working on?

Do you ask them probing questions? Set goals and outcomes for students' homework progress and program effectiveness. In the video, students report that outcomes from homework help include: Ask Yourself What are the outcomes of organizing and managing a high-quality homework help center? Do you think that these outcomes are met by your homework help center?

Are there ways that you can organize and manage your homework center to improve student outcomes? Think about your answers to the following questions: How do you organize and manage your homework center? What did you learn about this practice from seeing it in action? What are some new strategies that you would like to try in your program? What are the benefits of doing this? What outcomes do you expect? What are some of the challenges? What will you need to do this?

What skills do practitioners need in order to manage and organize the homework center environment? Create a learning environment or safe space to accommodate students' needs Consider use of space: Pay special attention to materials before, during, and following homework help time Provide all needed materials Plan for materials prior to homework help time Organize materials prior to and during homework time Store materials following homework help time.

Set a reasonable homework schedule for students Students' time matters Ten minutes per grade level for example, 40 minutes for fourth graders. Provide meaningful after-homework completion activities that: A "cyber study center" can be set up with only one online computer with headphones. Allow all students to rotate through the center sometime during the week. Stock the cyber center with appropriate, high quality activities.

Check with regular day teachers to see if computer enrichment games are available with textbooks students are using during the school day. Additionally websites such as Fun Brain and Gamequarium provide links to many fun, free online learning games. Note that using the cyber center only as a "reward" for having no homework or completing homework may result in students who need technology time not receiving it. You should consider your overall program and goals in your utilization of the center.

Ending the homework hassle: Understanding, preventing, and solving school performance problems. How to help your child with homework: The complete guide to encouraging good study habits and ending the homework wars. United States Department of Education. Helping your child with homework: For parents of children in elementary through middle school. When homework is not home work: After-school programs for homework assistance.

Educational Psychologist, 36 3: Does homework improve academic achievement? A synthesis of research, Review of Educational Research , 76 1: Using research to answer practical questions about homework. Relationships between five after-school activities and academic achievement. Journal of Educational Psychology, 91 2:


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When shopping for an afterschool program for kids with learning and attention issues, it’s important to look at how the program handles homework. Homework is one of the keys to academic success. But getting it done takes organization and time management skills.

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help. As a part of academic homework support, many afterschool programs offer tutoring and mentoring services. Afterschool tutoring programs that help students with academic work report an increase in achievement for students who participated on a regular basis (Bender, Giovanis, & Mazzoni, ).

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After-School Homework Assistance and Tutorial Program The Druid Heights After-School Hom ework Assistance and Tutorial program will operate Monday through Thursday afternoons from pm until pm at the Druid Heights Community Center located at McCulloh Street in Baltimore, Maryland. After-School Achievment Program (ASAP) Mission Statement. The goal at UCC is to engage youth in their education and help them to set high goals for their education and future job possibilities.

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When Homework is not Home Work: After-School Programs for Homework Assistance COSDEN, MORRISON, ALBANESE, MACIASAFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMS Merith Cosden, Gale Morrison, Ann Leslie Albanese, and Sandra Macias. Many afterschool programs offer structured homework help. Homework can often cause friction between kids with learning and attention issues and their parents. So getting it done during the program can make everyone’s evening more pleasant and relaxing. Make sure that the aides or other children aren’t doing the homework for your child.